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Research

Handa center research fellow publishes articles on economics & governance

Dr. Desiree Desierto, a research fellow at the WSD Handa Center for Human Rights and International Justice, has two forthcoming publications: "Formal Models of the Political Resource Curse” in Economics of Governance, and "What Resource Curse? The Null Effect of Remittances on Public Good Provision" in the Journal of Theoretical Politics.

What if California had a foreign policy? Stanford scholars weigh-in

As California and other states and cities act on their own on the international stage, Stanford scholars explore how these sub-federal actors are shifting the laws that would otherwise limit their state authority in foreign affairs.

California – the country’s most populous state and the world’s sixth largest economy – is challenging the legal limits of federal power in foreign affairs. From climate to immigration to human rights, California is increasingly acting on its own.

Stanford student conducts research on India’s 181 helpline for women

With co-sponsorship by the Center for South Asia and the WSD Handa Center for Human Rights & International Justice, Stanford student Japsimran Kaur, ’18, spent her summer working with a team of Stanford researchers in Gujarat, India.

Stanford Global Studies colleagues Sangeeta Mediratta, Associate Director, Center for South Asia, and Meredith Miller Vostrejs, Program Manager, WSD Handa Center for Human Rights & International Justice, sat down for a Q&A with Japsimran to reflect on her summer experience.

Research spotlight: Emma Puighermanal

As a postdoctoral fellow at the Institute of Functional Genomics in Montpellier, France, Emma Puighermanal works on how an important brain structure called the striatum controls behavior.

Dysfunction in the striatum is associated with multiple neurological and psychiatric disorders including Parkinson’s and Huntington’s disease, schizophrenia, autism, and addiction, among others. To better understand this structure and how it is affected by disease, she used different tools to study the striatum at the level of genes, neurons, and neural circuits.

Stanford scholars develop new algorithm to help resettle refugees & improve their integration

A new machine learning algorithm developed by Stanford researchers could help governments and resettlement agencies find the best places for refugees to relocate, depending on their particular skills and backgrounds.

As the world faces its largest crisis of displaced people since World War II, a new algorithm developed by Stanford researchers could help countries resettle refugees in a way that boosts their employment success and overall integration.

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