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What if California had a foreign policy? Stanford scholars weigh-in

As California and other states and cities act on their own on the international stage, Stanford scholars explore how these sub-federal actors are shifting the laws that would otherwise limit their state authority in foreign affairs.

California – the country’s most populous state and the world’s sixth largest economy – is challenging the legal limits of federal power in foreign affairs. From climate to immigration to human rights, California is increasingly acting on its own.

New book examines the decline of U.S. hegemony in the Western Hemisphere

In Bush II, Obama, and the Decline of U.S. Hegemony in the Western Hemisphere Thomas O’Keefe, lecturer in international relations, applies competing definitions and conceptions of hegemony to various foreign policy initiatives and events during the George W. Bush & Obama administrations to test whether they manifest a decline in traditional U.S. dominance and leadership in the Western Hemisphere.

Professor Milani discusses Iran's role in heightened Syria-Israel tensions on NPR

Tensions in the Middle East are high following military clashes involving Israel, Syria, and Iran earlier this month, and after the Syrian military shot down an Israeli fighter jet. Professor Abbas Milani, Director of the Hamid and Christina Moghadam Program in Iranian Studies, spoke with NPR's Michael Krasny about Iran's role in fueling instability in the region.

Stanford scholars develop new algorithm to help resettle refugees & improve their integration

A new machine learning algorithm developed by Stanford researchers could help governments and resettlement agencies find the best places for refugees to relocate, depending on their particular skills and backgrounds.

As the world faces its largest crisis of displaced people since World War II, a new algorithm developed by Stanford researchers could help countries resettle refugees in a way that boosts their employment success and overall integration.

Upholding Iran nuclear deal is wiser course for U.S. national interests, Stanford experts say

Stanford professors say upending the Iran nuclear deal would stymie U.S. efforts to solve the North Korean nuclear crisis, isolate America on the world’s stage and strengthen hard-liners in Iran.

If the U.S. abandoned the Iran nuclear deal, it would harm America’s credibility on nonproliferation issues and make it more difficult to solve the North Korean crisis, Stanford scholars say.

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